Maintaining Universal Primary Education

Lessons from Commonwealth Africa

E-book (PDF): £40.00
978-1-84859-045-8
Paperback: £50.00
978-0-85092-827-3

Maintaining Universal Primary Education
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Contributors: Lalage Bown
Publication date: 1 June 2009
Size: 240mm x 156mm
ISBN: 978-0-85092-827-3
Pages: 154

Every country that has worked towards, and then attained, universal primary education has celebrated that achievement as a great step forward. Maintaining universal primary education, once achieved, offers new challenges, examined in this book.

Lalage Bown and her co-researchers from the Council for Education in the Commonwealth explore the various economic, political and social pressures which may affect the progress of educational provision, as well as the different national educational policies and strategies themselves, as they play out in five very different Commonwealth African countries: Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia. The contributors’ findings will inform the decisions of both national and international education policy-makers working to ensure that universal primary education becomes, and remains, a reality across Africa.



ContentsExpand or collapse me

Foreword by Henry Kaluba  
List of tables and figures  
List of abbreviations  

1. Introduction and acknowledgements by Lalage Bown  
2. Ghana – Towards FCUBE (Free and Compulsory Universal Basic Education) by Francis K Amedahe and Balasubramanyam Chandramohan  
3. Kenya’s three initiatives in UPE by Alba de Souza and Gituro Wainaina  
4. Regaining momentum towards UPE in Zambia by Fidelis Haambote and John Oxenham  
5. UPE and UBE in a federal system – What happened in Nigeria by Felicity Binns and Pai Obanya  
6. Sustaining UPE against the odds in Tanzania by Peter Williams  
7. Lessons for the future by Lalage Bown  

Appendix. Growth in GER  

Sources and references  
About the authors

About the contributor Expand or collapse me

Lalage Bown (Editor)

Lalage Bown is Professor Emeritus of Adult and Continuing Education, University of Glasgow. She ended thirty years of work in African universities as Dean of Education, University of Lagos, having served in all the five countries studied in this book. She is a past president of the Development Studies Association and of the British Association for International and Comparative Education and is a former member of the CEC Board.